Reply To: The Right To Repair Movement – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Show

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions The Right To Repair Movement – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Show Reply To: The Right To Repair Movement – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Show

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions The Right To Repair Movement – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Show Reply To: The Right To Repair Movement – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Show

  • Joshua Rosen

    Member
    October 10, 2021 at 3:24 pm

    Right to repair is only tangentially related to DYI. Aptera will have to have a support strategy in order to sell their vehicles, most people don’t want to do their own repairs, I stopped even doing my own oil changes (back when that was a thing) 25 years ago. What Right to Repair is about is making the availability of parts and service information available so that someone besides the company itself can repair a device. For people who want to DIY right to repair makes their lives easier but more importantly it makes it possible for third parties, for example Electrified Garage in the case of EVs, to fix a vehicle with new factory parts and without having to reverse engineer the car. The two bogey men of the RTR movement are Apple and Tesla, both of which restrict the availability of parts to their own service people and provide no service manuals unless forced to by law. What’s not mentioned by the Right to Repair movement, because it would be impossible to legislate, is design for easy service. Take cell phones as a example. The battery is the one part of a phone that’s going to fail. Ten years ago all phones had replaceable batteries, all you had to do was slide the battery door open, no tools required, and drop in a new one. Then Apple started sealing the battery into the phone and everyone else followed. Now replacing the battery became a complex process, it was possible if you bought the right tools (I did it on my Nexus 5) but it wasn’t easy and there was a good chance that you would break something. To fix an iPhone you pretty much have to go to Apple. Google doesn’t care about the repair business, unlike Apple, so they farm out the job to third parties like uBreakifix. I had to replace the battery on my Pixel 4XL because it was swelling, I took it to uBreakifix and they did the job in a day. The repair was possible but it wasn’t easy like it was on my Galaxy Nexus so it was better left to someone who does it for a living.

    This is a long way of saying that in addition to making information and parts available it would also be highly desirable if they could design it so that a competent garage, but one that doesn’t specialized in Aptera’s, could do most repairs without having a lot of experience.