Reply To: Choice of battery manufacturer and chemistry

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Choice of battery manufacturer and chemistry Reply To: Choice of battery manufacturer and chemistry

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Choice of battery manufacturer and chemistry Reply To: Choice of battery manufacturer and chemistry

  • George Hughes

    Member
    August 23, 2021 at 3:23 pm

    I think we all need to remember that ‘data’ is what drives the economy these days. And what would a strategy of having X, Y and Z all supplying battery cells that fit within the range of power output specs.

    All of sudden Aptera has the data on all kinds of aspects of battery performance from three companies with meaningful amounts of data.

    The problem, of course, in this particular time, is that major car makers are trying to justify the massive weights and sizes of ICE vehicles. Their legacy production system is based on stamping steel which is welded together by an army of robots in a system that has operated as an effective barrier to competition because of the massive capital investment needed.

    Aptera, with its simplified manufacturing process involving exclusive use of composites for a super-strong, super-light, super-safe monocoque cockpit that can be built by real people, real artisans.

    This less is more, emphasis on efficiency in both production and in the essence of the vehicle is revolutionary change in the way cars ‘are made.’

    To me, the long term goal expressed in three-wheeled Aptera produced by 2050 is over 50 million as this car more simple than the Model T (16+ million made), more efficient than the VW Beetle (23-million) and a hellava lot more fun than the Toyota Corolla (40 million).

    So why do I think 50 million Aptera by 2050 is realistic? There is one trait that Aptera has with these and other cars like the Escort, Civic and VW Golf, all among the top selling car models of all time, is the sense of frugality they engender.

    And a car that ‘fuels itsself’ when left outside, has the highest range among EVs, rolls with only 75% of the resistance a 4-wheeled vehicle and is so aerodynamic that efficiency increases with speed, doesn’t dent or rust and is upgradable both over the air and by physical upgrade and may well last 40 or 50 years. That is FRUGAL on steroids.

    There was one other Ford on that list of the most produced vehicles. That was Sam Walton’s 1979 Red and White Ford F-150 that was his personal vehicle until he died over a decade later. Walton, who at the time was the richest man in the world, chose to drive the F-150 he bought new because he was frugal. <strong style=”font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; letter-spacing: 0px;”>Alan Dranow, senior director, Walmart Heritage Group said, “He loved that thing, and it embodied the practicality and frugality that was part of his business and personal life.”