The Right To Repair Movement – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Show

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions The Right To Repair Movement – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Show

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions The Right To Repair Movement – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Show

  • The Right To Repair Movement – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Show

     SonicMustang updated 1 week ago 7 Members · 7 Posts
  • Fanfare 100

    Member
    October 9, 2021 at 9:18 pm

    “Everything from iPhones and McDonald’s ice cream machines to medical equipment is now designed to be unfixable by the average person. Here’s how the Right to Repair movement is hoping to fix that.”
    Enjoy!
    https://youtu.be/UA7hZDfQDws

  • Randy J 20820

    Member
    October 10, 2021 at 6:08 am

    I’ve never seen this message before today, I’m in Canada:

    Video unavailable

    <yt-formatted-string>The uploader has not made this video available in your country.</yt-formatted-string>

    • Ray Holan

      Member
      October 10, 2021 at 7:06 am

      Given that we’re not likely to see Aptera dealerships in the foreseeable future, the DIY repairability of the Aptera is a critical success factor.

    • SonicMustang

      Member
      October 13, 2021 at 1:29 am

      I don’t watch that clown but the video is restricted in Canada because the television network wants it restricted. The uploader is the network. Check out Louis Rossman on YouTube. He owns a computer/smartphone repair business in NYC and has been fighting for right to repair.

  • Joshua Rosen

    Member
    October 10, 2021 at 3:24 pm

    Right to repair is only tangentially related to DYI. Aptera will have to have a support strategy in order to sell their vehicles, most people don’t want to do their own repairs, I stopped even doing my own oil changes (back when that was a thing) 25 years ago. What Right to Repair is about is making the availability of parts and service information available so that someone besides the company itself can repair a device. For people who want to DIY right to repair makes their lives easier but more importantly it makes it possible for third parties, for example Electrified Garage in the case of EVs, to fix a vehicle with new factory parts and without having to reverse engineer the car. The two bogey men of the RTR movement are Apple and Tesla, both of which restrict the availability of parts to their own service people and provide no service manuals unless forced to by law. What’s not mentioned by the Right to Repair movement, because it would be impossible to legislate, is design for easy service. Take cell phones as a example. The battery is the one part of a phone that’s going to fail. Ten years ago all phones had replaceable batteries, all you had to do was slide the battery door open, no tools required, and drop in a new one. Then Apple started sealing the battery into the phone and everyone else followed. Now replacing the battery became a complex process, it was possible if you bought the right tools (I did it on my Nexus 5) but it wasn’t easy and there was a good chance that you would break something. To fix an iPhone you pretty much have to go to Apple. Google doesn’t care about the repair business, unlike Apple, so they farm out the job to third parties like uBreakifix. I had to replace the battery on my Pixel 4XL because it was swelling, I took it to uBreakifix and they did the job in a day. The repair was possible but it wasn’t easy like it was on my Galaxy Nexus so it was better left to someone who does it for a living.

    This is a long way of saying that in addition to making information and parts available it would also be highly desirable if they could design it so that a competent garage, but one that doesn’t specialized in Aptera’s, could do most repairs without having a lot of experience.

  • John Malcom

    Member
    October 10, 2021 at 5:03 pm

    I am without a doubt, auto repair DYI challenged. I will not attempt a repair on any of my vehicles to include the Aptera when I get one. However, many others have those talents and will do well doing so. Certainly making available parts (Hopefully at a reasonable price) and manuals to all that may need to use them to affect repairs is important to facilitate repair under right to repair or DYI repair. <font face=”inherit” style=”font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; letter-spacing: 0px;”>Aptra goes a step father up stream. Aptera actively engineers simplicity and </font>reparability<font face=”inherit” style=”font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; letter-spacing: 0px;”> into the design of the production vehicles. This will also make it easier for automobile professionals to be </font>available<font face=”inherit” style=”font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; letter-spacing: 0px;”> and competent to repair Apterae </font>wherever<font face=”inherit” style=”font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; letter-spacing: 0px;”> they may be. </font>

    <font face=”inherit”>Perhaps I would ask an additional thing of Aptera. At some point make training available to third parties (Either through </font>their<font face=”inherit”> traveling repair teams or some other method) on repairing the Aptera so that all, a</font>mateurs'<font face=”inherit”> and professionals alike, do not have to rely on the manuals alone. </font>

  • my_discord_number_is_0328 bloody stupid

    Member
    October 11, 2021 at 5:05 pm
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