Geographical location concern

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Geographical location concern

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Geographical location concern

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  • Geographical location concern

  • ELISABETH SMART

    Member
    September 24, 2021 at 6:24 pm

    So I have a geographical location question. I live in Fairbanks, Alaska where we have daylight almost 24 hours a day in the summer and it can get to 90 degrees. But the Spring and Fall have less daylight and the temps can range from 10 above to 60 degrees.

    Has there or will there be any research on how the vehicle would do in a colder climate?

    Obviously it would not be driven in the winter which can range from 10 below down to 50 below here in Fairbanks, and a lot of snow.

    Is reserving a vehicle practical for my area or will it be a financial mistake?

  • Leonard Nowak

    Moderator
    September 24, 2021 at 6:50 pm

    There website solar calculator will give you some insight for your solar zone

    They haven’t announced their final battery choice but the FAQ on their website stated -20 F to +125 F

  • Joshua Rosen

    Member
    September 24, 2021 at 7:23 pm

    I’m not counting on any solar energy and I don’t think it matters. The car is supposed to use 100Wh per mile. Take a look at your electrical bill and divide the KWh cost by 9 to get the cost per mile (use 9 instead of 10 to account for charging loses). I’m paying 25 cents per KWh so I would expect to pay less than 3 cents per mile, that’s nothing. If the solar charging is important to you then find the solar energy that you get. When they say 40 miles a day they are talking about California which gets around 6 KW per square meter. I live in MA which only gets 3 KW per sq meter which is why I don’t think it will help me. Your 24 day in summer makes it harder to compare but it’s an interesting calculation to make. What you know for sure is that you won’t get any solar energy in the winter.

    As for how it performs in the winter I’m taking a wait and see attitude. I have no intention of getting rid of my Tesla after I get an Aptera. I’ll want to go through one winter before making the decision as to whether it’s an all season car or just a summer car. You should make the same assumption, it will work fine in the summer how it handles snow and extreme cold is an open question that only time will answer.

  • Ken Bolinsky

    Member
    September 24, 2021 at 9:09 pm

    I don’t understand why it would be obvious that you wouldn’t drive an Aptera in winter: EVs don’t stop working in extreme cold – it’s just that the electrochemical processes in their batteries slow down and they’re not able to store as much power when charging if they’re not warmed to an appropriate temperature. It’s really no different than having to use an engine block heater on an ICE vehicle.

    Remember that – at this moment in time – Aptera has created 3 working prototype vehicles: Physical models of a vehicle that had only been a design in a computer up until a year ago. They are currently working on a refined version of the design for the next level of prototyping – and there are two more levels of prototype to go after that! We won’t see any serious testing until the design has matured to the point of manufacturability – otherwise the testing would be pointless.

    Your $100 deposit (or $70 if you use someone’s referral code) really only reserves you a spot on line to actually make a reservation when production begins: You’re not making a purchase. Depending upon myriad considerations and variables, your deposit number means that you’ll most likely be able to buy your Aptera before those individuals you place a deposit at a later date than you. If you change your mind the deposit is fully refundable. If you decide to stick with it your deposit will be deducted from the cost of the vehicle.

    • Joshua Rosen

      Member
      September 25, 2021 at 7:49 am

      It’s the three wheels that I’m worrying about, not the battery. How will the car handle in a snow storm. Nobody can answer that yet. It might be fine but until there is some real world experience the safe assumption is that it’s a summer car. As I said in my previous response my plan is to take one through a winter before deciding if it can be an only car. People do have EVs in Alaska so in theory it should be able to handle the cold as long as they design the battery heater to be able to handle 50F below.

      • Owen Harding

        Member
        October 19, 2021 at 2:12 pm

        I am also wondering how winter will treat the vehicle. I kick my car to have the ice built up in the hubs drop off. Will the tire covers get clogged with snow and Ice?

  • John Malcom

    Member
    September 24, 2021 at 9:25 pm

    As Ken Bolinsky pointed out, there are a lot of development iterations before a production vehicle is delivered. Specs and the results of testing will be announced for production vehicles. That would be the time to examine the performance envelope to determine suitability for your particular circumstances. Reserving now saves you a place in line should you decide to purchase. If you decided not to purchase you get your money back. Sounds like a no trainer to me.

  • Jan Kilpinen

    Member
    September 25, 2021 at 3:32 am

    I live in Finland and I was thinking of getting the full solar package so that I won’t have to scrape the long rear window clean of ice and snow every time I leave from work – any other benefit the solar panels provide will be an additional bonus. I see EVs all the time driving around here.

  • Robert Klasson

    Member
    September 25, 2021 at 5:00 am

    I live in Sweden. We get about 2000 h of sunlight each year, but only about 200 of those hours are during the winter. I typically drive about 10000 miles/year, and the solar calculator has me charging just a couple of times a years with full solar. It probably doesn’t take into account the uneven distribution of sunlight though. I will probably get more than I need during the summer and will need to plug in a couple of time a month in the winter.

    I plan to get the full solar to make the most out of the sun we get. I also plan to get the 400 mile version to be able to store an extra week or two of range, even though I would probably get along just fine with the 250 mile version. I hope I can transfer any excess energy produced with full solar in summer to my wife’s regular EV using the built in AC-outlet and our granny cable.

  • Peter Jorgensen

    Member
    September 25, 2021 at 7:40 am

    You’ll be fine. Iceland and Norway are selling mostly EVs now and they drive year round and it’s really cold.

    Worst case you spend $100 on a reservation and cancel it if you don’t like the snow driving reviews.

  • ELISABETH SMART

    Member
    September 25, 2021 at 10:02 am

    All great responses, Thanks! I do agree with not counting on too much solar power, especially in the Spring and Fall but the long battery range is impressive. Summer would be excellent for solar though.

    I have “pre-reserved” an all wheel drive and either 400 or 600 KWh vehicle. This will be a late Spring thru late Fall (September lol) vehicle. I live up a 11% grade driveway and snow and that incline would be hellacious on a 3 wheel vehicle. AWD is beneficial even in Summer as all our roads are gravel, including the driveway. I have a 1924 Ford Model T and the driveway can be scary for that one.

    Looking forward to production, and eventual delivery. This is exciting to have such a remarkable vehicle concept!

  • Curtis Cibinel

    Member
    October 19, 2021 at 3:12 pm

    Regarding the summer and solar in alaska you might need to park on a ramp to optimize the angle. Solar cells definitely still work in general. I would be concerned about FWD in cold conditions – AWD will help a ton in your climate.

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