Full. CHarge over night?

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Full. CHarge over night?

Aptera Community Aptera Discussions Full. CHarge over night?

  • Full. CHarge over night?

  • Spenser Pousette

    Member
    November 12, 2021 at 3:11 pm

    If most battery is drained daily , will it be able to keep up with 300-500 miles a day? Is that bad for the battery ?

  • Curtis Cibinel

    Member
    November 12, 2021 at 4:12 pm

    Best to plan daily use as 20-80% even if that means a bigger battery.

    • Elzo Stubbe

      Member
      November 14, 2021 at 7:09 am

      And make additional calculations for the solar panel pack on the vehicle. When sunny conditions are to be expected and you know through experience how high the solar recharging level is during the day, that would also be something to take into account. Subtract it from the optimal 80%….? And ask Aptera motors if it would be possible for the driver to activate or deactivate the solar charging…Or create the possibility to store this energy for later use…

  • BRUCE MENGLER

    Member
    November 12, 2021 at 4:21 pm

    I have a wall charger in my garage that is wired to a 40A 240V breaker. I was informed that they only allow 80% of the rated capacity which yields 32A * 240V = 7680 Watts or 7.7kW.

    A 60kW battery can be recharged by my unit in under 8 hours

  • George Hughes

    Member
    November 12, 2021 at 4:45 pm

    Batteries are like everything, eventually they wear out. Using the 20-80% advice from Curtis, the longest-lived option would be the 100 kw battery. That would require, for overnight charging, probably at the least a 7kw home EVSE if not one higher. Eight hours charging at a 7kwh rate would roughly recharge the Aptera to 800 miles range (80%) and presumes a discharge to approx 300 (30% low charge). The Aperta should perform at that rate, based on the experience from other EV makers using actively cooled/heated batteries would be at ten years.

    The 500 mile overnight charging regime could also be accomplished with the 600 mile (60kw) battery though the percentage charge required would suggest a 90-95% max charge and a 5% minimum charge to accomplish the 500 mile daily commute.

    Considering most folks in average traffic are challenged to maintain, even on highways, an average speed of 50 mph, this means 10 hours of daily travel time. Add the eight hours to charge (and sleep) with a 7kwh EVSE system (assuming the Aptera will at least charge at home at that rate on 220vac – I think there are upto 10-11kwh EVSE’s if the car supports it.) and there are six hours left for meals and face to face. It just seems an impossible commute.

    As far as using DC fast charging, it would be more expensive and certainly more inconvenient than replenishing the used power from a home EVSE.

    • kerbe2705

      Member
      November 12, 2021 at 9:57 pm

      The last they spoke of it, Aptera was planning to use a 3.2 kW charger in the vehicle – because it was smaller and would generate less heat.

  • Spenser Pousette

    Member
    November 12, 2021 at 9:02 pm

    I appreciate it, it’s usually not 500 a day (closer 150-350 but can get up there and would worry that could kill the battery a lot faster. Then special batteries costing alot to redo etc etc. seems to make sense for a work car for me! Extra special marketing in style!

  • Joshua Rosen

    Member
    November 13, 2021 at 6:41 am

    If you are really driving that much every day you should buy the 1000 mile version. Nickle cobalt battery life is dramatically effected by maximum charge level, as I recall from a paper I saw a couple of years ago at 100% the battery is good for 500 cycles, 90% doubles the life to 1000 cycles and at some lower level it further improves it to 1500 cycles. A cycle is defined as the full capacity of the battery. I would assume that the numbers for the batteries that they use in the car will be somewhat different than these but as a rule of thumb they are a good guide. If you are doing the huge number of miles a day that you say you are then you’ll want to keep the maximum charge level to 80% and to have the biggest battery that you can get. The number of miles that a battery will last is a function of the size of the battery which is why bigger is better in your case. For people who put on a normal 12000 miles a year the smaller batteries are fine, the battery will last long enough that other factors will limit the cars life (if nothing else it will become obsolete). But you are doing 10X that so if you want the battery to last more than a couple of years you should get a big one and never charge it to more than 80%. At the very least get the 600 mile battery and research the charging stations along your route. You will need to make multiple stops anyway, it’s not healthy to drive more than a few hours without breaks, however the Aptera will have a very feeble charging speed, 60KW, and if it charges like most cars where the average speed is significantly slower than the peak speed, you shouldn’t assume more than 40KW average charging rates. 40KW is 100 miles in 15 minutes which isn’t great but you might be able to live with that since you will want several breaks during the day.

    May I ask the question, how are you putting on that many miles a day?

    • Lou Verner

      Member
      November 13, 2021 at 7:11 am

      Joshua, wasn’t there some talk about Aptera having accommodations for Tesla fast charging and Tesla in fact granting access to Aptera? I would have thought that meant they could be charged at much higher charging rate than what you stated. Was I dreaming?

      • Ryan Holmgren

        Member
        November 13, 2021 at 8:12 am

        I believe just because they can use the Tesla charger, that doesnt necessarily mean the vehicle can charge at those supercharger rates. It all depends on what the folks at Aptera decide to make the charge rate at. From what I remember they stated it should get 500 miles in 30 minutes so Seems to still be pretty good.

        • Lou Verner

          Member
          November 13, 2021 at 8:17 am

          If true, I would say that’s at least as fast as anything I’ve heard so far!

          • Robert Klasson

            Member
            November 14, 2021 at 12:16 am

            According to the FAQ, the currently expected fast charging rate is 100 miles in 10 minutes, which is 300 miles, not 500 miles in 30 minutes, assuming a pretty flat charging curve. Going by charge curves for other EV’s, I would expect only the 600 and 1000 mile versions to be able to keep this up for 30 minutes, and only from a low starting state of charge. I’m hoping the charge curve will be flatter than normal EV’s though, since the limiting factor for the Aptera may be the cable dimensions and/or heat management and not limited by the battery itself.

      • kerbe2705

        Member
        November 13, 2021 at 8:16 pm

        Remember: The Alphas were built using some salvaged Tesla parts. There was a great deal of SPECULATION about a deal with Tesla but, in fact, there has been no official mention of same.

        We have been told that Aptera will have 50 kW CCS charging capability. The higher the charging rate, the more heat is generated in the battery pack: Aptera does not have a cooling system that involves fans and radiators to dissipate that heat.

      • Joshua Rosen

        Member
        November 14, 2021 at 8:20 am

        They teased a Tesla connector in a video but now the FAQ says CCS. They also infer a maximum rate of 60KW in the FAQ, hopefully they will rethink this but there may be engineering reasons that they’ve set it so low, specifically they might not have the cooling capacity to do better.

        Tesla is opening up the Supercharger network to CCS cars and they will be offering an adapter. However it will be a very expensive way to charge an Aptera if they stick with the 60KW charging rate. Tesla has said that they are going to charge a premium for slow charging cars as they should because they tie up the stall for a longer period of time.

        There actually are a lot of CCS chargers out there, most are crappy 60KW chargers with only one or two plugs per station, however if the Aptera can only charge at 60KW then the old CCS units will be fine. Also because of the range of an Aptera if you do your planning right you should be able to get to the next one if the station you are at is down.

  • John Trotter

    Member
    November 13, 2021 at 8:31 am

    Until we know for sure the battery specifics (chemistry, mostly), it’s premature to say what the less-wear charging options are, other than slower is better. Another consideration is that batteries are advancing rapidly still, and a replacement five or ten years from now may make sense – assuming Aptera keeps with “right-to-repair” design. Mostly, as my Tesla social media groups remind new EV users, don’t worry too much about batteries and range. Just enjoy the car.

    • Lou Verner

      Member
      November 13, 2021 at 7:54 pm

      From what I’ve seen of design, kinda looks like battery packs are located forward in belly section below passenger compartment. Isn’t that permanently fixed to top half? If so would seemingly preclude battery replacement.

      • kerbe2705

        Member
        November 13, 2021 at 8:20 pm

        The belly is not part of the body. In this image I’ve circled the belly pan – you can see the seam and the location of connectors.

      • Oz Man

        Member
        November 13, 2021 at 8:24 pm

        Lou, That graphic in the configurator is really misleading at best, it shows an increase of one similar size pack from 25k to 40k to 60k then a smaller one going to 100k, as reality would dictate that is incorrect, I’m not sure I would rely on the graphic for any clue as to how the packs will be placed. It’s similar in execution to the animated GIF they had for a while that showed the cooling channels throughout most of the vehicle body including the in the doors. I don’t think the illustrator they use has a real grasp on how most of it will really work.

        • Lou Verner

          Member
          November 14, 2021 at 4:12 am

          So if the graphics are misleading, where exactly are those packs and how would they be accessed? Thanks!

          • Oz Man

            Member
            November 14, 2021 at 5:40 am

            We can only guess until Aptera releases the information. (Perhaps with some pix would be nice.)

  • Spenser Pousette

    Member
    November 14, 2021 at 12:02 pm

    I consult for a few large home improvement companies. So travel a lot meeting with homeowners all over central cal. I was wondering if they have any type of marketing for up here. I’ll be all over!

    • Joshua Rosen

      Member
      November 14, 2021 at 2:14 pm

      The 600 mile version should do the trick for you, you’ll be able to do 400 miles in a day on an 80% charge without doing any DC charging, for days when you have to go 500 miles you can add a hundred miles with one stop which you’ll be doing anyway.

  • Peter Jorgensen

    Member
    November 15, 2021 at 7:46 am

    I think 600 mile would be fine – especially if you are willing to stop at a charger to eat lunch. Otherwise if you’re concerned about bad weather and snow and hot/cold I’d go for the 1000 mile and you’ll never have to worry about it as long as you charge at home. In general, plan for 50% of your range as being useful minimum for trips if you stay above 20% and are dealing with cold weather. If you charge to 100% at home it’s better but ideally you’re staying between 20% and 80%. Even with a 1000 mile version you’re going to save a TON on gas.

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