COP26

  • COP26

     Ronster updated 2 weeks, 5 days ago 7 Members · 21 Posts
  • Ronster

    Member
    October 28, 2021 at 12:18 pm

    The 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference is also known as COP26 or the 26th such conference.

    Sun., Oct. 31, 2021 – Fri., Nov. 12, 2021.

    Last conference was in 2019.

    Video: Greta Thunberg Has Given Up on Politicians

    “All political and economic systems have failed, but humanity has not yet failed.”

    #COP26 #GRETA #CLIMATECHANGE

    https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000008010161/greta-thunberg-climate-crisis.html

  • Lou Verner

    Member
    October 28, 2021 at 12:23 pm

    No surprise…they’ve been brutally consistent in that regard for 30+ years and no proposals on table currently anywhere close to addressing “house on fire” emergency.

    • John Malcom

      Member
      October 28, 2021 at 3:03 pm

      You are our expert in this area I believe as an Environmental Engineering type? You must be more upset about this than the rest of us neophytes with this issue and more frustrated with the lack of remediation over the decades.

  • Lou Verner

    Member
    October 28, 2021 at 3:51 pm

    Retired ecologist and yes John, more upset than perhaps most. Was lecturing about dangers of Climate Change 35 years ago. Had we started to address issue when all Climatologists were warning of what would happen if we didn’t take steps to reduce GHGs, we might have had decent chance of avoiding catastrophic effects. Too late now. Our collective (global) (in)actions have always spoken louder than our words…no country has come close to living up their Paris Agreements and unless we really went WWIII level commitment, we will fail to prevent that catastrophe. Sadly it’ll be our grandchildren not current policy makers that will pay the price of our inaction

    • John Malcom

      Member
      October 28, 2021 at 4:04 pm

      I am embarrassed to say I am one of those do nothing generation people who contributed to lack of action to fix something we knew about. I guess in denial. If I ignored it somehow it would go away. Sorry now of course. My guilt over such neglect on my part is one of the reasons I am so actively supporting Aptera. I have a grandson following in your foot steps. He is a freshman majoring in Environmental engineering. He and his friends are so energetic and committed to the cause. It is inspiring.

      Thank you for your decades of work banging your head against the wall for us. At least a clean conscience

      • Hans Roes

        Member
        October 31, 2021 at 11:38 am

        It’s not like we have been ignoring it. Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth was for many people an eye opener 15 years ago and the international world has been setting targets and taking actions for a long time now. The last couple of years we have been talking about the Paris agreement, but before that one we had a major international agreement in the Kyoto Protocol which was signed all the way back in 1997 and has been adopted by a major part of the world.

        The biggest issue I have today with organisations like for example eXtinction Rebellion or Youth for Climate is that it is simple for them to protest and say that there is inaction and that we are not doing enough. When you have a single point on the agenda, it’s easy to be critical. But once you switch over to the other side and you look at the fine balance that politicians have to uphold, it becomes something entirely different.

        People often point to inaction from politics, but politics did work on issues like acid rain and the hole in the ozone layer. When was the last time you noticed anyone talking about those issues? And it’s not like politicians are not taking action against climate change. But they have to do so at a pace that is fast enough to keep the world habitable but slow enough not to collapse the majority of the world’s economies.

        Because I have never seen those climate extremists come up with workable solutions that not only take care of the climate, but also ensure that we actually have a peaceful and stable society to live in. A prime example is e.g. Greenpeace. They say no to oil, to gas, to nuclear and basically to any other power source. But they do not propose a working alternative to power our world. Renewables alone are not going to cut it and clean alternatives are decades away, regardless of how much money you would throw at it.

        • Pistonboy Delux

          Member
          October 31, 2021 at 8:59 pm

          To Hans Roes – Thank you very much. Well said. If the economy tanked, the same people who complain about the environment would complain about the economy. They complain but don’t do much. They criticize technical people for creating the problem, but it is the technical people who develop solar cells, wind mills, and thorium power.

        • Lou Verner

          Member
          November 1, 2021 at 2:12 pm

          Hans, sorry but I will repeat what I said in earlier post: actions speak louder than words. No major G-20 country has come close to living up to their promised levels of GHG reductions spelled out in Kioto or Paris Agreements. Had we done so in timely fashion, we wouldn’t be in emergency situation we now find ourselves. Politics is indeed major roadblock- jeez we can’t get a single R vote and not even all Ds to agree to Biden proposal. Given our lack of serious action over past 30 years, we are now unfortunately going to have to have governments spend considerably more to save us from spending an order of magnitude more on the cost of NOT acting in terms of floods, wildfires, drought, property loss, climate refugees, international conflicts, etc, etc. Just hearing all of this on NPR right now!

  • Lou Verner

    Member
    October 28, 2021 at 8:59 pm

    John, never to late to lend your voice, encouragement, especially to your grandson and his friends. Would be interesting to have conversation with them and get their perspective on this! Aptera is certainly on right path and I applaud you for your steadfast support of their endeavor and providing us with invaluable insights from your most relevant career!

    • Curtis Cibinel

      Member
      October 28, 2021 at 9:47 pm

      Sad state of the world. I choose not to have kids in hopes those that inherit this mess have more to go around since resources like food be more rare when 💩 hits the (404 fan emoji not found). I’m 38 and expect to see the beginnings of a world scifi would call “post apocalyptic” just from climate by the time I die.

      Ps: my sister had 4 kids… Can’t even get to average in my immediate family. Progress is hard…

  • George Hughes

    Member
    October 28, 2021 at 9:51 pm

    We were on the ‘right road’ when Jimmy Carter wore the sweater and put solar cells on the White House. Then we cut taxes, opted for Hummers, and remarked how warm and wonderful it was that morning in America.

    While a journalist I was publicly ‘fair and balanced’ when it meant being ‘fair and balanced’ I’ve been mourning in America ever since.

    The Aptera will be my first “new” car since the 1980’s as one of the few ways to be ecologically responsible was to buy used as I could rationalize I was not contributing to the new car demand – I.e. they weren’t smelting the iron, refining the oil for plastics and making the steel – all energy intensive activities – ‘for me.’

    Still, I wish I knew then what I know now. What’s that?

    That every gallon of gasoline we burn, whether in a lawn mower, chain saw or vehicle, the result is emitting the equivalent in ‘mass’ of Co2 of 608 empty beer cans, tossed carelessly into the atmosphere. That is like tossing out the window one empty aluminum beer can every second in a car getting 10 mpg at 60 mph.

    I don’t litter (paper, etc.- you should see the floorboard of my car) but here I was littering on steroids for decades so I’m not innocent, either.

    • Curtis Cibinel

      Member
      October 28, 2021 at 9:58 pm

      I agree in general but the refinement of combustion processes does count. You can drive 1000 miles (with ice car) and be under the emissions of a leaf blower for an hour. Small engines are an easy fix. Ice to evs is well along and will be 90%+ done by 2040. Air and sea transport will require some first principles thinking of its own (hydrogen?) and will take decades longer. As far as nuclear it could have saved a ton on emissions if implemented aggressively more in the 70s but it’s now of little use due to regulations and viable renewable/storage; it isn’t worth it anymore.

      Ps: Sorry for anyone now wanting a political debate. Sorry not sorry 😅

      EDIT: For those needing less depression

      • George Hughes

        Member
        October 28, 2021 at 10:36 pm

        Curtis:

        The refinement in combustion may make an ICE car go 35 miles on a gallon vs. 22 miles, but the plain fact is that combusting a gallon of gasoline produces over 19.6 pounds of Co2; somewhere in the range of >8800 grams. An empty aluminum beer can is a little under 15 grams (14.7-14.9 grams/can).

        The benefit of improved ICE engines is they use less fuel but the fuel remains the same.

        In terms of the car getting 10 mpg at 60 mph pooping a can every second as it runs down the road; a refined, efficient ICE powered car that gets 60 mpg at 60 mph simply poops an empty beer can mass of Co2 every ten seconds. Whoopie.

        The point is, it wouldn’t make any difference if you throwing an empty beer can out of your car every second or every ten seconds; the law would pull you over for littering. We all get away with it – and yes I still have an ICE pickup truck that I drive about 100 -200 miles A YEAR – because Co2 is a tasteless, odorless, invisible gas to which we have turned a blind eye.

        But a gallon of gas only weighs about 5.7 lbs … so how could it create 19 pounds of carbon dioxide? The answer is here: https://blueskymodel.org/gallon-gas

        Seems there are other molecules in the reaction. I’m not saying that you get 19.6 pounds of carbon from 5.7 pounds of carbon (about the weight of a gallon of gas). That would defy physics! It is saying you get 19.6 pounds of carbon dioxide and 8.3 pounds of water from 5.7 pounds of gasoline (1 gallon) and 20.5 pounds of oxygen.

        • Curtis Cibinel

          Member
          October 28, 2021 at 10:46 pm

          I’m sorry if what I said defended use of ice cars. Replacing everyone’s leaf blowers (vs cars) is an easy way to a part of greener future. Both are needed improvements. The transition from ice to ev can’t happen soon enough but I tend to see transitions as slow; people hate change and the alternatives must be universally better for them to see benefit. The personal transport area is important but energy use in general as a society has other elements which also need solutions. I believe (might be missquoting) that 7% of energy goes to steel production. That’s a lot of energy in dirty processes which already has the ability to use just (potentially green) electricity vs massively emitting coke (slightly refined coal).

          Funny that Mercedes eqs (from legacy auto) is using carbon emission free steel (green steel) and tesla is buying from others that haven’t adapted processes despite 30% profit. If they embraced their overall mission statement the method of steel would could enough to care about the impact of their material supply (vs short term profit).

          • George Hughes

            Member
            October 29, 2021 at 10:02 am

            Yep, one of the cool things about Aptera is the composite body. (Are they still going to use hemp as the key fiber matting composit?)

            I also get that the issue is greater than just cars as I do have an electric leaf blower, electric riding lawnmower, electric chain saw … etc.

            I think we all know not cry over spilt milk. I actually think some entrepreneur should be making an effort to come up with easily repeatable way to hybridize existing cars, trucks and tractors largely because they’ve already been manufactured.

            I mean why hasn’t someone taken a pair of Elaphe in-wheel motors, a clever ignition system, a 20kw battery and stuck them on the front of an old 2WD pickup to make it a 4WD with an EV range of 50 miles.

            • Curtis Cibinel

              Member
              October 31, 2021 at 12:03 pm

              Unfortunately cars have too much deviation in parts/space and it is too specialized skillset for large scale conversions to be practical. This concept would require cheap kits and a relatively simple process which is just not the case; batteries and motors are expensive and a lot of time/skill needs to go into the process for any given car. Its not to say conversions are impossible but car conversions in statistically significant numbers is something that I cant see happening.

              The best we can do is to make as many new EVs as possible, drive ICE cars as little as possible (use alternatives), and ensure the ICE cars are properly disposed of. Once EV supply starts to match demand governments will need to switch from subsiding EVs to more aggressively subsidizing disposal of used ICE (vs selling to college kids for $1000); pay for it with new ICE car taxes until the ban.

              The EV charging networks have also effectively banned non-commercial EVs from charging making long distance travel impossible. This is somewhat justified since they are not tested to ensure compliance with safety or electrical specifications and EV fires make news.

  • Ronster

    Member
    October 29, 2021 at 10:09 am

    I certainly could see the benefit of Hydrogen Fuel Cell tech being used for generators to replace diesel, natural gas or other home backup systems &/or applications etc.

    I see huge plus there IMHO over automotive use, at this time; given the current trajectory of battery use in vehicles.

  • Ronster

    Member
    November 8, 2021 at 2:09 am

    This First Person column is written by Hafsa Salihue who is studying environmental management at Simon Fraser University.

    (CBC News – Canada)

    How backpacking in the Rockies made me rethink having kids

    Hafsa Salihue backpacked the Berg Lake Trail in B.C.’s Mount Robson
    Provincial Park in June 2021. She wonders if her kids would even have
    the opportunity to soak in their majesty or if they would melt due to
    the ongoing climate crisis.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/first-person-climate-change-kids-1.6238928

  • Ronster

    Member
    November 16, 2021 at 5:15 am
    • Ronster

      Member
      November 16, 2021 at 5:16 am
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